Who was Robert Hooke and what did he do?

Who was Robert Hooke and what did he do?

Robert Hooke, (born July 18 [July 28, New Style], 1635, Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England—died March 3, 1703, London), English physicist who discovered the law of elasticity, known as Hooke’s law, and who did research in a remarkable variety of fields.

Who was Robert Hooke and what was his biggest discovery?

Robert Hooke was a famous scientist, born in 1635. He most famously discovered the Law of Elasticity (or Hooke’s Law) and did a huge amount of work on microbiology (he published a famous book called Micrographia, which included sketches of various natural things under a microscope).

Who formed the Royal Society of London?

Robert Boyle
Christopher WrenWilliam Petty
Royal Society/Founders

The Royal Society originated on November 28, 1660, when 12 men met after a lecture at Gresham College, London, by Christopher Wren (then professor of astronomy at the college) and resolved to set up “a Colledge for the promoting of Physico-Mathematicall Experimentall Learning.” Those present included the scientists …

Who was involved in the Royal Society?

Joined by other leading polymaths including Robert Boyle and John Wilkins, the group soon received royal approval, and from 1663 it would be known as ‘The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge’.

Who was Robert Hooke’s siblings?

Robert had a brother who was five years older, named John, the same name as his father. Relatively few details of Robert’s childhood are known.

Who was Robert Hooke influenced by?

In 1673, Hooke built the earliest Gregorian telescope, and then he observed the rotations of the planets Mars and Jupiter. Hooke’s 1665 book Micrographia spurred microscopic investigations….Robert Hooke.

Robert Hooke FRS
Academic advisors Robert Boyle
Influences Richard Busby
Signature

Who was Robert Hooke Class 9?

He was the first person to name and observe cells through cork cells. Complete Answer: – The cell is the basic building block of life. Robert Hooke first observed cells while studying cork cells under the microscope.

How did Robert Hooke come up with his discovery?

Discovery of the Cell When he looked at a sliver of cork through his microscope, he noticed some “pores” or “cells” in it. Hooke believed the cells had served as containers for the “noble juices” or “fibrous threads” of the once-living cork tree.

Where did the Royal Society of London founded?

November 28, 1660
Royal Society/Founded

Who was the first president of the Royal Society?

Lord Brouncker
At the second meeting, Sir Robert Moray announced that the King approved of the gatherings, and a royal charter was signed on 15 July 1662 which created the “Royal Society of London”, with Lord Brouncker serving as the first president.

Who was first FRS?

Ardaseer Cursetjee
The honour of being the first Indian Fellow of the Royal Society goes to Ardaseer Cursetjee (1808-77), marine engineer at Bombay, who was elected on 27 May 1841 (figure 1).

Who were Robert Hooke’s parents?

John Hooke
Cecily Gyles
Robert Hooke/Parents
Robert Hooke was born in the town of Freshwater, on England’s Isle of Wight, on July 18, 1635. His parents were John Hooke, who served as curate for the local church parish, and Cecily (née Gyles) Hooke.

What did Hooke do for the Royal Society?

Hooke served as The Royal Society’s Curator of Experiments where he was required to perform several demonstrations at each weekly meeting. He held this position for forty years. Fellow of Royal Society. The Hooke Medal is presented in his honor from the British Society of Cell Biologists.

Who is Robert Hooke and what did he discover?

Robert Hooke. Written By: Robert Hooke, (born July 18 [July 28, New Style], 1635, Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England—died March 3, 1703, London), English physicist who discovered the law of elasticity, known as Hooke’s law, and who did research in a remarkable variety of fields.

Is there a portrait of Robert Hooke?

Although a portrait of Robert Hooke was seen at the Royal Society in 1710, none exists now apart from the memorial window at St Helen’s Bishopsgate, which is merely a formulaic portrait. The absence of image is also figuratively true – Hooke has been unjustly obscured by his contemporaries.

How did Robert Hooke help Robert Boyle?

Assisted Robert Boyle by constructing his air pump. Hooke designed, improved or invented many scientific instruments used in the Seventeenth Century. Hooke was the first to replace pendulums in clocks with springs. He invented the compound microscope and Gregorian compound telescope.